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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

3 edition of Minority ownership of broadcast facilities found in the catalog.

Minority ownership of broadcast facilities

United States. Federal Communications Commission. EEO-Minority Enterprise Division.

Minority ownership of broadcast facilities

a report.

by United States. Federal Communications Commission. EEO-Minority Enterprise Division.

  • 340 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Federal Communications Commission, Office of Public Affairs, EEO-Minority Enterprise Division in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Minorities in broadcasting -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      ContributionsCCG, inc., Conference on Minority Ownership (1977 : Washington, D.C.)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHE8689.8 .U547 1980
      The Physical Object
      Pagination64 p. :
      Number of Pages64
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4237150M
      LC Control Number80601583

      Andrea Adelson, Minority Voice Fading for Broadcast Owners, N.Y. TIMEs, , at D9. "'The unfortunate reality in our na-tion today is that race and gender still matter,' said Bill Kennard, the FCC's first black chairman. 'We all benefit when broadcasting, our nation's most influential medium, reflects.   Books Entertainment Film and Motion Picture data on the impact FCC ownership rule changes would have on minority and female broadcast ownership. Nexstar's efforts to .

        Its own policies are responsible for the shameful state of minority ownership. The elimination of Black owners is a tragedy, but the FCC must take action to address its own failures. Federal oversight of all broadcasting has had two general goals: to foster the commercial development of the industry and to ensure that broadcasting serves the educational and informational needs of the American people. In many respects, the two goals have been quite complementary, as seen in the development of network news operations and in the variety of cultural, educational, and public.

      A national effort has emerged to foster ownership of broadcasting facilities by members of racial and ethnic minorities. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the courts, the executive branch of government, and members of congress, have all backed the case for more minority ownership in the broadcasting industry. Special interest groups, such as the National Association of Broadcasters. Register your business to make it a distinct legal entity. How and where you need to register depends on your business structure and business location.


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Minority ownership of broadcast facilities by United States. Federal Communications Commission. EEO-Minority Enterprise Division. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Minority ownership of broadcast facilities: A report [United States. Federal Communications Commission. EEO-Minority Enterprise Division.] on *FREE* shipping Minority ownership of broadcast facilities book. Minority ownership of broadcast facilities.

[Washington, D.C.]: Federal Communications Commission, Office of Public Affairs, EEO-Minority Enterprise Division, (OCoLC)   The FCC conference led to a follow-up report a year later called “Minority Ownership of Broadcast Facilities.” It revealed some of the obstacles for potential minority broadcasters.

Minority ownership of media outlets in the United States is the concept of having ownership of media outlets to reflect the demographic population of the area which the media serves.

This is to help ensure that media addresses issues that. Full Title: Statement of Policy on Minority Ownership of Broadcasting Facilities Document Type(s): Public Notice Bureau(s): Media DA/FCC #: FCC 26 See Statement of Policy on Minority Ownership of Broadcast Facilities ( Minority Ownership Policy Statement), 68 FCC2d().

27 See Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet, Committee on Energy and. 5 The FCC first began to encourage minority ownership of broadcast stations inin response to an initiative by President Jimmy Carter.

Federal Communications Commission, “Statement of Policy on Minority Ownership of Broadcasting Facilities, FCC ,” Public Notice,   "The absence of minority owners meant the pressure to hire people unlike oneself was very low," David M. Rubin, dean of the S. Newhouse School of Public Communications at.

The finance devices pertaining to minority ownership of broadcast facilities include "tax certificates", "distress sales", and "reduction in financial qualification requirements for radio and television applicants". In addition, "Rule Waivers" is a final order which is not financial in nature, but lnvo.

1 h. It is apparent that there is a dearth of minority ownership in the broadcast industry. Full minority participation in the ownership and management of broadcast facilities results in a more diverse selection of programming.

In addition, an increase in ownership by minorities will inevitably enhance the diversity of control of a limited resource, the. FCC TAX CERTIFICATES FOR MINORITY OWNERSHIP OF BROADCAST FACILITIES: A CRITICAL RE-EXAMINATION OF POLICY BRUCE R.

WILDEt About twenty years ago, the Federal Communications Commis-sion (Commission or FCC) first considered the issue of racial minor- ity group participation in the broadcasting industry.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. With this report, Changes, Challenges, and Charting New Courses: Minority Commercial Broadcast Ownership in the United States, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) revisits the important topic of minority ownership of broadcast agency, through its Minority Telecommunications Development Program (MTDP), has.

As the Commission observed in its Statement of Policy on Minority Ownership of Broadcasting Facilities, "ownership of broadcast facilities by minorities is [a] significant way of fostering the inclusion of minority views in the area of programming," and "[f]ull minority participation in the ownership and management of broadcast facilities.

Despite the FCC’s mandate to make the public airwaves available to all citizens without regard for “race, color, religion, national origin, or sex,” the U.S.

broadcast industry suffers from a pitiable shortage of minority owners. As of today, only 12 out of 1, full-power, commercial TV stations are black-owned – less than one percent. Commission’s Policy Regarding the Advancement of Minority Ownership in Broadcasting, and Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 92 F.C.C.

2d (). 9 Statement of Policy on Minority Ownership of Broadcast Facilities, 68 F.C.C. 2d at note 8. 10 FCC’s Tax Certificate Program: Hearings Before the Senate Comm.

however, minority ownership in the broadcast industry has grown. from less than 1 percent to a modest 3 percent of all stations in the United. States. Therefore, because between and minority ownership in. the broadcast sector tripled on a percentage basis while the total number of. The representation of African Americans in media – speech, writing, still or moving pictures – has been a major concern in mainstream American culture and a component of media bias in the United States.

Such media representation is not always seen in a positive light and propagates controversial and misconstrued images of what African Americans represent. Minority broadcast owners (and, according to Dubin and Spitzer, women owners) have a greater tendency to program differently than white owners, though this diversity registers at the level of.

MINORITY COMMERCIAL BROADCAST OWNERSHIP OVERVIEW. Since the National Telecommunications and Information Administration's ("NTIA") Minority Telecommunications Development Program ("MTDP") began collecting data on Black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American ownership of commercial broadcast stations inminority broadcast ownership totals have.

Media cross-ownership is the common ownership of multiple media sources by a single person or corporate entity. Media sources include radio, broadcast television, specialty and pay television, cable, satellite, Internet Protocol television (IPTV), newspapers, magazines and periodicals, music, film, book publishing, video games, search engines, social media, internet service providers, and.

By Bruce R. Wilde, Published on 01/01/This retrospective study on Federal Communications Commission policy addresses why minority broadcast ownership has waned as a civil rights issue since the s, and it.

The minority population in the U.S. is expanding. But its ownership of American broadcast properties is not. Non-Hispanic whites owned 69 .